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Language and Sustainable Development #4 - Prof Nancy Kula - Shared screen with speaker view
Friederike Lüpke
19:32
Hi from Helsinki to everyone!
Lutz Marten
20:05
Hi Friederike! Welcome back to the UK :)
Friederike Lüpke
20:40
Hahaha, I've been back often!
Heliany Rakhmasanti
27:51
HELIANY RAKHMASANTI... PONOROGO ...EAST JAVA... INDONESIA...watching
Friederike Lüpke
40:58
I love your research principles!
Naeim
01:04:49
Is your work pubished?
Ian Cheffy
01:05:17
Interesting research, revealing the complexities in classroom practice.
Lutz Marten
01:05:23
If I was Edgar Lungu, do you think there is need for me to set up (different) policies?
Naeim
01:05:33
thanks, cannot wait
Colin Reilly
01:05:41
All our blog posts are here - https://multilingual-learning.com/project-blog/
Kathryn Jones
01:06:00
Your research is most interesting - it would be good to know more about your project
Colin Reilly
01:06:18
My particular favourite, from our RA Martha, reflecting on data collection in Zambia - https://multilingual-learning.com/initial-insights-into-learners-language-practices-in-multilingual-classrooms-of-nakonde-district/
Ian Cheffy
01:07:21
We hear so often that teachers are not assigned to their home areas for fear of tribalism. I wonder how real that fear is. Do we know of examples of countries in Africa where teachers are successfully assigned to their home area without creating issues of tribalism?
Kristina Riedel
01:07:28
Very nice project and nice overview! I am wondering about the possible impact of closeness/remoteness in the multilingual interactions (e.g. Namwanga might be fairly easy to understand to/from Bemba but this would be very different from Tswana vs. Khoisan languages)
Joy Peyton
01:08:18
Are teachers receiving professional development on ways to respect Namwanga when students speak it and engage them in the use of Bemba rather than correcting them?
Friederike Lüpke
01:08:29
Formal school contexts are very highly regulated spaces, and it's really interesting to see how language policies are subverted. You say you want to encourage translanguaging practices. Do you have evidence of other educational spaces that are more open to fluidity (from my own research contexts, I'm thinking of things like Q'uranic education, village assemblies, etc. that may have established multilingual practices.
Rachel Bowden
01:09:43
I wonder how you negotiate the possibilie gap between your view of 'languages' and how people are actually using language, in the classroom and community - it seems from your extracts there was a lot of TLANG, or LX practice, that people might not see in those terms.
Rachel Bowden
01:16:38
Didi you explore attutudes to student talk in the classroom in general (any languages) do teachers consider student talk a valuable learning process and/or objective?
Rachel Bowden
01:16:47
Ah typo!
Siham Rouabah
01:18:43
from my experience in the fieldwork, people speak economics rather than just multilingualism and translanguing. is there any evidence small and medium-sized companies and economic institutions are taking those language policies and practices into consideration of recruitment and job careers
Friederike Lüpke
01:19:22
Thank you for a very inspiring talk! Your comparative perspective is really important. Good luck for the continuation of your research.
Hannah Gibson
01:19:26
Really good question Siham! We have some examples of signage from companies at least doing exactly that!
Rachel Bowden
01:19:41
Greatm thanks for today, great presentation and fascinating project!
Bojana Petric
01:19:53
Very interesting, thanks!